2021 STEM Pathways for Girls Conference

2021 STEM Pathways for Girls Conference

STEM Santa Fe Presents
2021 STEM Pathways for Girls Conference

Open to Northern New Mexico girls in 5th-8th grade

Earth Stewardship Through STEM

Conference Program

In-person Workshops at Santa Fe Community College on Saturday October 30, 2021
plus
Virtual Evening Presentation on Friday October 29 and Saturday October 30 at 5:30 PM, live on YouTube

 

Saturday October 30, 2021
at Santa Fe Community College
Morning Session

8:30 – 8:55 AM Parents Check-in at West Wing

9:00 – 10:15 Workshop 1

10:30 – 11:45 Workshop 2

11:45-12:00 Student Survey/Group Photo OUTSIDE

12:00- 12:15 PM Parent Check-out at West Wing

Afternoon Session

12:30 – 12:55 PM Parents Check-in at Main Entrance

1:00 – 2:15 Workshop 1

2:30 – 3:45 Workshop 2

3:45-4:00 Student Survey/Group Photo OUTSIDE

4:00-4:15 PM Parent Check-out at Main Entrance

Map of
Santa Fe Community College

Due to COVID restrictions, we are staggering the participants into a morning group and an afternoon group. Each participant can attend EITHER the morning session or the afternoon session of the conference but not both.

October 29, 5:30 PM: STEM is Beautiful
Opening Keynote Speaker:  Rebecca Erickson
Senior Staff Scientist at
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Rebecca Erikson is a senior staff physicist at the US Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. She has worked on a variety of new and exciting technologies in her 12 years at PNNL, including pushing the art of what’s possible on 3D Printers and inventing the cellphone microscope for STEM education. Rebecca has a Master’s of Science in applied physics and a Bachelor’s of Science in engineering physics, both from the Colorado School of Mines. Outside of work, Rebecca loves nature and spends her time camping, hiking, gardening, and staring at the stars.

Saturday October 30, 5:30 PM: Planning a career in science
Closing Keynote Speaker: Dr. Donna Nelson
Chemistry Professor at University of Oklahoma

Dr. Nelson has focused on two areas, Scientific Research and America’s Scientific Readiness. Her scientific research includes (1) mechanistic patterns in alkene addition reactions and (2) Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube (SWCNT) functionalization and analysis. America’s Scientific Readiness focuses on (3) science education, which includes classroom innovations and correcting organic chemistry textbook inaccuracies, (4) ethnic and gender diversity among highly ranked science departments of research universities, such as the Nelson Diversity Surveys, and (5) improving the presentation of science and images of scientists to the public, such as serving as a science advisor to a television show.

 

Registration closes October 24!

Space is limited

All the presenters are women working in STEM professions who want you to experience the challenge and fun of STEM!

Due to our funding restrictions, priority for space will be given to students Northern New Mexico and more specifically in the following counties: Santa Fe, Taos, San Miguel, Mora, Sandoval, Rio Arriba, and Los Alamos.

Due to COVID restrictions, we are dividing up the number of participants into a morning group and an afternoon group. Each participant can attend EITHER the morning session or the afternoon session of the conference but not both.

The workshops will be in small groups and  in-person at Santa Fe Community College, under COVID-safe practices

Saturday October 30, 2021
at Santa Fe Community College
Morning Session

8:30 – 8:55 AM Parents Check-in at West Wing

9:00 – 10:15 Workshop 1

10:30 – 11:45 Workshop 2

11:45-12:00 Student Survey/Group Photo OUTSIDE

12:00- 12:15 PM Parent Check-out at West Wing

Afternoon Session

12:30 – 12:55 PM Parents Check-in at Main Entrance

1:00 – 2:15 Workshop 1

2:30 – 3:45 Workshop 2

3:45-4:00 Student Survey/Group Photo OUTSIDE

4:00-4:15 PM Parent Check-out at Main Entrance

Map of
Santa Fe Community College
Due to our funding restrictions, priority for space will be given to students Northern New Mexico and more specifically in the following counties: Santa Fe, Taos, San Miguel, Mora, Sandoval, Rio Arriba, and Los Alamos.
Registration form is available in English and Spanish


Register Now

Parent/Guardian needs to register their child
El padre / tutor debe registrar a su hija
Groups of 10 or more will need to contact registration@stemsantafe.org or call 505-539-0394.

Group Choices

Marie Curie Group

9:00 am – 10:15 am: The Secret Code of Computers & Robots

10:30 am – 11:45 am: Physics of Flight

Chien Shiung-Wu Group

9:00 am – 10:15 am: Physics of Flight

10:30 am – 11:45am: Explore How Glaciers Move and Melt

Cecilia H. Payne Group

9:00 am – 10:15 am: Explore How Glaciers Move and Melt

10:30 am – 11:45 am: The Chemistry of Colors

Mae Jemison Group

9:00 am – 10:15 am: The Chemistry of Colors

10:30 am – 11:45 am: Water Planning in a Changing Climate

Ada Lovelace Group

9:00 am – 10:15 am: Water Planning in a Changing Climate

10:30 am – 11:45 am: Healthy Soil Principles

Hedy Lamarr Group

9:00 am – 10:15 am: Healthy Soil Principles

10:30 am – 11:45 am: The Secret Code of Computers and Robots

Florence Nightingale Group

1:00 pm – 2:15 pm: Studying Wildfires from Space

2:30 pm – 3:45 pm: Design a Wind Turbine

Human Computers Group

1:00 pm – 2:15 pm: Design a Wind Turbine

2:30 pm – 3:45 pm: Lights! Candy! Action!

Julia Robinson Group

1:00 pm – 2:15 pm: Lights! Candy! Action!

2:30 pm – 3:45 pm: Aquaponics and the Future of Agriculture

Rosalind Franklin Group

1:00 pm – 2:15 pm: Aquaponics and the Future of Agriculture

2:30 pm- 3:45 pm: BanaNAs and other NAs

Flossie Wong-Staals Group

1:00 pm – 2:15 pm: BanaNAs and other NAs

2:30 pm – 3:45 pm: Plants, water, and climate

Shirley Ann Jackson Group

1:00 pm – 2:15 pm: Plants, water, and climate

2:30 pm – 3:45 pm: Studying Wildfires from Space

Click here to learn more about Women in STEM whom the groups are named after.

Questions? Call (505) 539-0394 or email registration@stemsantafe.org

Preguntas? Llame al (505) 539-0394 o envíe un correo electrónico a registration@stemsantafe.org

We have many exciting workshops for girls to choose from! Due to COVID restrictions, we are dividing up the number of participants into a morning group and an afternoon group. Each participant can attend EITHER the morning session or the afternoon session of the conference but not both.

All the presenters are women working in STEM professions who want you to experience the challenge and fun of STEM!

Workshop Descriptions

The Secret Code of Computers & Robots
Use Raspberry Pi (credit card sized computers) to explore and learn about binary numbers (0 and 1), binary encodings, littleBits (snap together circuits to perform functions), Arduino (language-based coding), Scratch (block-based coding)
Teri Roberts
Retired LANL computer scientist – now owner of teri.tech, LLC
Physics of Flight
In this hands-on workshop, students will explore the physics of air pressure, the Bernoulli Principle, and why airplanes fly. Hands-on activities show how the force of air pressure acts on everyday objects (empty cans, balloons, paper, ping pong balls), leading to the concept of lift, with a final activity of flying paper helicopters and gliders. Physics principles include air pressure, lift, drag, thrust, force. Engineering / Earth Stewardship principles include energy efficiency, fuel consumption, customer safety. For COVID safety, we will use very small fans (TBD) so that the students remain masked while manipulating objects with moving air.
Debbie Post
Manufacturing & Systems Engineer, Sandia National Laboratories
Explore How Glaciers Move and Melt
The workshop will focus on how glaciers and ice sheets flow, melt and change sea level. The students will use goo to explore how ice caps spread and glaciers flow downhill. Each group would use different surfaces and/or variations in goo recipe to discover the factors that affect how quickly ice moves. Followed by an explanation of the different ways ice sheets can lose mass. Time allowing, we would also cover how ice sheets interact with the solid Earth beneath them, using a demonstration of isostasy/post glacial rebound. Using differently weighted wooden blocks floating on a tank of water, we would measure how the height of block above the water line changes as “ice” (white weights of some kind) is removed from the wooden block “crust”.
Sophie Coulson Elizabeth Hunke
Directors Postdoctoral Fellow in the Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling Group at Los Alamos National Laboratory Scientist in the Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling Group at Los Alamos National Laboratory
The Chemistry of Colors
The presentation aspect will be 10-15 minutes covering the major concepts related to the chemistry of colors and describe the activities. Chemistry concepts will envelop fluorescence and chromatography. Applied biology relating to earth stewardship will be discussed for each activity that includes bee eyesight (UV), pollination, and food resources and/or bioluminescence and fluorescent labeling and its importance.
Valerie Kuehl Monica Sanchez
Postdoctoral Researcher, Los Alamos National Laboratory Postdoctoral Researcher, Los Alamos National Laboratory
Water Planning in a Changing Climate: The Role of Hydrologic Models in Decision-making
Water is a critical resource. In a state already grappling with water scarcity issues, projections indicate that climate may further constrain water availability for New Mexicans. In this workshop we will explore how hydrologic models can help planners manage water now and into the future. Participants will be introduced to the State’s 50-year water planning effort. We will briefly discuss the concept of the hydrologic cycle, water balance/accounting, and the role of climate in the state’s planning process. Participants will work with the Dynamic Statewide Water Budget model to evaluate the potential impacts of climate change on the hydrologic cycle and explore water management strategies that may improve hydrologic resilience in the coming decades.
Katie Zemlick John Mumm
Hydrologist, New Mexico Office of the State Engineer, Hydrology Bureau Water Planner/Water Master, New Mexico Office of the State Engineer
Healthy Soils Principles
We will be looking at different types of soils through microscopes to see the size of particulates and any microorganisms and bugs. We will do an experiment where we run water through the various soil types to see how permeable they are/ how well water is retained. This will allow the girls to see/ understand how different types of soil affect/ support various types of organisms as well as plant life that grows within different types of soils. The major take away is to understand what healthy soils look like and the importance for the flora and fauna in that environment.
Peggyjoy Hodgen Shannon Palermo
Volunteer Coordinator/ Horticulture Care, Railyard Park Conservancy Volunteer, Railyard Park Conservancy
Studying Wildfires from Space
This workshop is inspired by an activity from the NASA Jet Propulsion Lab for middle school kids that deals with being able to analyze and study satellite images of wildfires. The students will be looking at several images derived from remote sensing techniques and will learn how to extract valuable information from these. They will learn how to read maps and assess images of burned areas for some of the largest wildfires the US has encountered in most recent years. They will also learn basic concepts on how to navigate Google Earth, as well as how the importance of different types of imagery, like true color versus infrared images, and how these play a role in remote sensing of wildfires. They will also have a basic understanding of one of the most common natural phenomena happening in the US today and the importance of understanding what wildfires do to the environment.
Dorianis Perez
Graduate Research Assistant, Los Alamos National Laboratory
Design a Wind Turbine
Learn about wind turbines. Students will design and try out what gives the most power.
Magdalena Dale
Electrical Engineer, Los Alamos National Laboratory
Lights! Candy! Action!
Students attending our workshop will be given inexpensive light sources – both white light and monochromatic sources (i.e. inexpensive laser pointers or LEDs) and a variety of transparent colored objects including stones/marbles, plastic baggies, and edibles such as gummy worms and other candies (although with COVID concerns, we will be mindful to use baggies and advise students to wash hands and eat the candy after the workshop). Given the proximity of the event to Halloween, candies seem especially appropriate. The students will be invited to examine light transmission effects with a variety of combinations of light and objects. Of course we will include the usual warnings and cautions about safe use of lasers and avoiding shining into someone’s eyes.
Danielle McDermott Annie Ung
Scientist / Physicist, Los Alamos National Laboratory R&D Engineer, Los Alamos National Laboratory
Aquaponics and the Future of Agriculture
The hands on component of the workshop will be seeding and harvesting vegetables, feeding fish, and collecting water quality data from an aquaponic system. We will cover the biology of the symbiosis between plants, fish, and bacteria that forms the basis of aquaponics. This includes learning how fish produce ammonia, how nitrifying bacteria convert it into nitrates, how plants uptake and utilize nutrients, and how plants act as a biofilter to clean the water for the fish.
Natasha Farmer
Adjunct Faculty/ Agricultural Educator, Santa Fe Community College
BanaNAs and other NAs
Have you heard the terms DNA and RNA a lot lately? In this workshop, we’ll learn about DNA and RNA along with technologies that keep bringing them up in our daily lives. We’ll talk about important women who have worked in these fields such as Rosalind Franklin and Katalin Karikó. During our discussions, we’ll perform an experiment to extract DNA from bananas and other fruits using household ingredients.
Tracy Mallette
Ph.D. Student, University of New Mexico
Plants, water and climate
The girls will measure hydraulic conductivity of branches of different plant species and learn about differences in plant water use, how that influences plant responses to climate, and how vegetation affects climate.
Sanna Sevanto Kelsey Carter
Research Scientist, Los Alamos National Laboratory Postdoctoral Researcher, Los Alamos National Laboratory

How many workshops will each girl attend?

Each participant can attend 2 workshops in ONE group. Each workshop is 1.25 hours long. There will also be two keynote addresses virtual live on Youtube.

Can girls attend from anywhere in the world?

Due to our funding restrictions, priority for space will be given to students Northern New Mexico and more specifically in the following counties: Santa Fe, Taos, San Miguel, Mora, Sandoval, Rio Arriba, and Los Alamos.

Do parents/guardians have to be present at all times at the conference?

The parents/guardians just need to check their girls in and out. They do not need to attend with them. We actually do not allow it as this makes the girls uncomfortable. The parents can hang out on campus while the girls are in the classroom in the workshops if they wish. The keynote addresses portion of the conference are virtual this year and live on Youtube. We encourage the whole family to attend those with their girls.

How much do I need to pay for my girl to attend?

There is only an enrollment fee of $25 per girl. It is waived upon request if that is a burden on the family. It is the only cost to the families.  Sponsors and donors cover the complete cost of attending the conference ($150 value). The enrollment fee is non-refundable.

How can I pay the enrollment fee if I do not want to use a credit card?

You can pay with cash or check. The check is payable to “STEM Santa Fe”. You can bring the cash or check with you on the day of the conference or mail to: P.O. Box 33103, Santa Fe, NM. 87594.

What if we cannot afford the enrollment fee but would still like my child to attend?

The registration form will ask if you will like us to waive the fee for your child.

Can I register my daughter for the conference without going through the online registration platform?

Yes, you can register by calling 505-539-0394 and leaving a message and someone will call you back to take down your information.

Can I switch my child to a different group once I registered her?

You can log back into the system where you registered your child and switch groups if space is available. If you are having trouble, contact registration@stemsantafe.org or call 505-539-0394.

How will the virtual keynote address take place and how will the participants be able to ask questions?

The keynote address will be broadcasted live on STEM Santa Fe’s YouTube channel. We will send you a link to the broadcast and questions for the speaker can be texted to 505-539-0394.

Diamond Sponsor

Wildflower International
Triad/Los Alamos National Laboratory
Santa Fe Community Foundation, Santa Fe Hestia Fund
Lineberry Foundation

Platinum

N3B Los Alamos

Gold

OpenEye Scientific
Santa Fe Community College

Silver

Santa Fe Community Foundation, Las Campanas Community Grants Fund
Enterprise Bank and Trust
Sandia National Laboratories
Nusenda Credit Union
Sandia Area Credit Union

Bronze

Deep Future Analytics
NM EPSCoR
McCune Foundation
Walmart
Souder, Miller & Associates

Supporters

Santa Fe Community Foundation, Rabinowe Family Fund
Los Alamos Women In Science
Del Norte LOV Foundation
New Mexico Network for Women in Science and Engineering

And special thanks to the individuals and families who make our programs possible

2021 STEM Pathways for Girls Conference Planning Committee

Lina Germann, Conference Chair
Kara Luitjohan, Workshops Coordinator
Jean McLarty, Volunteers Coordinator
Marissa Corley, Registration Committee
Julie Jung, Keynote Speakers Coordinator
Caroline Cavalie, Marketing and Technology Coordinator

In addition to the wonderful workshop presenters and many of the volunteers who are committed to making this conference successful, we are thankful for the talents and support of our Graphic Designer Joshua Haggard and our Development & Marketing Associate Natasha Farmer.